Africans aren’t black, they’re ebony-complexioned; black is a “white supremacist” tag

The Ebony people of Africa were tagged ‘blacks’ as part of an ‘overall supremacist agenda’ and in a derogatory, and even demonizing, style with the objective of manipulating or ‘undermining the African being’ to a surrender or deference to the ‘superior’(white) Caucasian.’

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In reconnecting with the African identity, scholars have pointed out that Africans are not black people. No humans are created black; animals could be black. Black is an attribute of energy or power with which God endowed creation. Black is an expression of the absence of or complete absorption of light..

The Ebony people of Africa were tagged ‘blacks’ as part of an ‘overall supremacist agenda’ and in a derogatory, and even demonizing, style with the objective of manipulating or ‘undermining the African being’ to a surrender or deference to the ‘superior’(white) Caucasian.’

With skin of various shades or blends of ebony radiance, Africans can largely be described as ebony-complexioned. Whether it is the marshmallow skin blend, the pretty pecan brown skin, the peanut butter truffle tone, the alluring amber, the browned caramel skin shade, the milk chocolate shade, the expresso brown skin, or the delicious cacao black skin, it is all in the ebony and it is rich, protective (rich in melanin) and brilliant..

No human is created black; black is an expression of the absence or complete absorption of light.

Caucasian colonialists succeeded in making “whiteness” a central inheritance of modernity—a dynamic, living watershed where beliefs, symbols, aspirations, and self-constituting and affiliative practices that reaffirm hierarchical systems of difference collect.

In “Whiteness: An Introduction,” Steve Garner explains that though “whiteness has been conceptualized over the century or so since it was first used as terror, systemic supremacist symbolism, cultural capital, and contingent hierarchies,” it has no consensual meaning.

Michael Foucault, a French philosopher, explains that “whiteness” remains a “synergistic system of transversal relationships of privileges, norms, rights, modes of self-perception and the perception of others, unquestioned presumptions, deceptions, beliefs, “truths,” behaviors, advantages, modes of comportment, and sites of power and hegemony that benefit whites individually and institutionally.”.

Dr. George Yancy, a professor of philosophy, frames whiteness as a form of racism: “Whiteness continues to be a living, breathing historical construction, a social ontological (nature of being) performance that has profound consequences for nonwhite people.” Yancy argues that colonialism has managed to place whiteness as possessing definition of being human in our contemporary world. 

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